New Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Treatments 2021



Article last updated on 4/1/2021


What is Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)?

Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) is a slow-growing disease in which too many immature lymphocytes (white blood cells, which are cells of the immune system of the body) are found mostly in the blood and bone marrow.

Sometimes, in later stages of the disease, cancer cells are found in the lymph nodes and the disease is called small lymphocytic lymphoma. A leukemia is a type of cancer that develops in blood-forming tissue, such as bone marrow. It is a disease that does not create lumps or tumours but is rather characterized by the large-scale production of abnormal and immature blood cells. In the event of acute leukemia, the immature blood cells increase rapidly, while in chronic leukemia the cells develop in a more normal manner, resulting in the disease taking longer to set in.1


What are new treatments for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)?

There are several medicines for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) that have been approved. Here are some of the newest treatments for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL):


Calquence (acalabrutinib)4,5

Calquence (acalabrutinib) is a kinase inhibitor indicated for the treatment of adult patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukaemia (CLL). Calquence (acalabrutinib) can be used on its own (monotherapy) in patients with CLL who have had previous treatment and on its own or in combination with obinutuzumab in patients who have not had prior treatment.

On November 21, 2019, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), USA approved acalabrutinib (Cal­quence; AstraZeneca) as initial or subsequent therapy for adult patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) or small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL).

On November 9, 2020 the European Medical Agency (EMA), European Union for the treatment of adult patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL).


Imbruvica (ibrutinib)6

Imbruvica (ibrutinib) is a first-in-class Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitor used to treat adults with: Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) who have received at least one prior treatment. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL)/Small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL).

On April 21, 2020 the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), USA approved Imbruvica (ibrutinib) in combination with rituximab for the treatment of previously untreated patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) or small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL). This approval marked the the 11th FDA approval for Imbruvica (ibrutinib) since it was first approved in 2013 and the sixth in CLL, the most common form of leukemia in adults.


Venclyxto/Venclexta (venetoclax)7,

Venclexta/Venclyxto (venetoclax) is a B-Cell lymphoma-2 (BCL-2) inhibitor (chemotherapy) indicated as monotherapy for the treatment of people with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), with or without the 17p deletion, who have received at least one prior therapy.

Venclexta/Venclyxto (venetoclax) was approved by:

  • Food and Drug Administration (FDA), USA: April 11, 2016, for the treatment of patients with CLL or small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL) with or without 17p deletion who have received at least one prior therapy.
  • European Medical Agency (EMA), European Union, December 5, 2016 for the treatment of CLL in the presence of 17p deletion or TP53 mutation in adult patients who are unsuitable for or have failed a B-cell receptor pathway inhibitor and for the treatment of CLL in the absence of 17p deletion or TP53 mutation in adult patients who have failed both chemoimmunotherapy and a B-cell receptor pathway inhibitor.
  • Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA), Australia, January 5, 2017, in combination with rituximab, for the treatment of adult patients with CLL who have received at least one prior therapy. As monotherapy, it is indicated for the treatment of patients with relapsed or refractory CLL with 17p deletion or patients with relapsed or refractory CLL for whom there are no other suitable treatment options.
  • Health Canada, September 2016, in combination with rituximab, for the treatment of patients with CLL who have received at least one prior therapy. As monotherapy it is indicated for the treatment of patients with CLL with 17p deletion who have received at least one prior therapy, or patients with CLL without the 17p deletion who have received at least one prior therapy and for whom there are no other available treatment options.
  • MedSafe, New Zealand, November 2, 2017 in combination with rituximab, for the treatment of patients with CLL who have received at least one prior therapy. As monotherapy it is indicated for the treatment of patients with CLL with relapsed or refractory CLL with 17p deletion, or with relapsed or refractory CLL for whom there are no other suitable treatment options.

If you are trying to access a treatment for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) that is approved outside of your country of residence, we might be able to help you access it with the help of your treating doctor. You can read more about the medicines we can help you access and their price below:



Why access Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) treatments with TheSocialMedwork?

TheSocialMedwork is registered in The Hague with the Dutch Ministry of Health (registration number 6730 BEM) as an independent medicines intermediary. We have helped patients from over 85 countries to access thousands of medicines including. With a prescription from your treating doctor, you can count on our expert team to safely and legally guide you to access a new drug for CLL. If you or someone you know are looking to access a medicine that is not yet approved where they live, we can support you. https://thesocialmedwork.com/contact-us Contact us for more information. Contact us for more information.


References:

  1. Nhs.uk
  2. Astrazeneca.com
  3. Astrazeneca.com
  4. Globenewswire.com
  5. Calquence (acalabrutinib)- Thesocialmedwork.com
  6. Imbruvica (ibrutinib) - Thesocialmedwork.com
  7. Venclyxtob (vynclyxta/venetoclax) - Thesocialmedwork.com

Disclaimer: This article is not meant to influence or impact the care provided by your treating physician. Please do not make changes to your treatment without first consulting your healthcare provider. This article is not intended to diagnose or treat illness or to influence treatment options. TheSocialMedwork is as diligent as possible in compiling and updating the information on this page. However, TheSocialMedwork does not guarantee the correctness and completeness of the information provided on this page.